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Showing posts from August, 2012

HOUSE OF SPEAKER SEAT CHOSEN, HOW?

Things are looking real rosy in Mogadishu at the moment. We have officially nominated a House of Speaker. Mr Mohamed Osman Jawariwas elected by MPs with a majority in a smooth transaction. For those of you that are mystified how the process goes, it’s pretty straightforward. Let me explain in further detail.
Before the election, it was decided in principle on an agreement called 4.5. What does this 4.5 mean? Well, this 4.5 is a share of control between the 4 major clans of Somalia and 0.5 consisting of the minority. For those of you that are common in Somali affairs, you would understand that in Somalia, Clan is a major factor in society. One cannot come into a house and re-arrange the seating and furniture. You have to first acknowledge the way things are, and then maybe from time to time, try to arrange on a step by step basis, the interior of the building.
Somalia has 4 major tribes consisting of: Hawiye, Darood, Diir and Rahanwayne. They are part of the 4 agreement parties and 0…

Youth 4 Change Project – SOYDEN - Mogadishu

I got invited on Thursday 16th August, to a youth exhibition which took place and organised by “SOYDEN”, a youth Educational assignment aimed at young Somali youths who have been traumatised by the 2 decades of war and unrest in Mogadishu. Osman Moalin, the Executive Director at SOYDEN arranged for me, and 2 other guys I know from London, to give out a lecture or a confidence building talk to the youths in a scheme named “Youth 4 Change” funded by USAID and UNDP.
From the moment we walked in, all we could see was 200+ young Somali youths in full buzz, who this time last year, where in the streets of Mogadishu carrying AK-47s doing robberies, roadblocks and caught up in street gangs. Fast forward a year the youths have already learned how to read and write, built their social skills and integrated with rival gangs who they couldn’t see eye to eye with before. For me personally, it was a privilege to be able to be given the time to get collectively involved with the youths who share t…

ELECTION FEVER HITS MOGADISHU

5 days more and counting. Somalia is on the brink of a change. At least that’s what we all hope. I am writing this report with a great enthusiasm. The atmosphere in Somalia is buzzing. Cars with their presidential nominee and large trucks full of people chanting another candidates name and waving his pictures. It seems as if we Somalis are ready for change and stability, ready for this anticipated election. One only has to see for him/herself to feel the excitement running through Mogadishu.
21 years of anarchy and struggle looks to be wiped of the map. At this precious moment, we are witnessing history to actually see for once, euphoria of political interest throughout the country. From young to old, rich or poor, all hoping to see this election go through. We have seen enough to let this opportunity go to waste.
After a recent pool we conducted at MogaTribune, the race is tight and with no clear leader. President Sharif, his prime minister Abdiweli Gass , the house of speaker, Shar…

THE FUTURES BRIGHT, THE FUTURES YOUTH

Emerging from chaos, we can finally breathe and look forward to the future. We are free. Free of Clan based hate and now free from extremist. On the 20th of August, we should finally know who officially, is our president. One thing is for sure, our future president cannot and should  not forget the youth.


We, the youth, will determine how Somalia moves forward. Let alone the ones based in Somalia, there over millions of young hungry youths in the Diaspora who want their country back. We, the diaspora, are tired of being foreigners. We want our country back. There are vast amount that are losing our culture, tradition and stories. This cannot go on. The president must listen to the youth. The majority of our elders all have clan based ideology. But we do not. We want a society which is just and free to everybody, regardless of their clan.
When I arrived in Mogadishu, I could not relate to any of my peers. Some see us  as foreigners in our own land. But we all had one thing in common, …